Is stretching tired muscles now a business proposition?

There’s a new group of businesses on the block, ready to repair sore muscles after those tough lunchtime gym sessions and loosen up keen golfers’ arms for a better swing.

The rise of inner-city workouts and bad posture has created a brand new niche, reports The New York Times this week: stretching exercises.

The value of the simple stretch has been lost in a vortex of CrossFit, yoga and strength classes, and entrepreneurs in Boston, New York and Los Angeles are now promising they can “re-educate” the muscles of adults to improve flexibility and bring people’s focus back to slow movements.

At Power Stretch studios in New York, for example, clients can work towards being able to touch their toes for the first time in years, after taking a series of one-on-one sessions for around $100 a pop.

“There are all these peak fitness places that have popped up. People go five times a week and their muscles are very overworked and contracted,” founder Hakika “Kika” V. DuBose tells the New York Times, reflecting on the appeal of her business.

On Facebook, the business explains that the “Kika” method is about encouraging its users not to give up and to give things a go.

Sports and exercise fads are nothing new, particularly in cities like New York, experts say, but businesses are capitalising on an enthusiasm for stretches at the right time. The pendulum is swinging back from exercise businesses that promise intense workouts to those promoting mindfulness and relaxation.

Then there’s another promise from Power Stretch that could get punters through the door and keep them there: “Come and find out your ‘stretch age’ from one of our amazing stretching coaches,” the business promises on social media.

A quick look at one’s muscles and the Power Stretch staff will be able to give the customer their “real age” based on their ability to stretch—along with a new target age to work towards.

Never miss a story: sign up to SmartCompany’s free daily newsletter and find our best stories on TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

You can help us (and help yourself)

Small and medium businesses and startups have never needed credible, independent journalism and information more than now.

That’s our job at SmartCompany: to keep you informed with the news, interviews and analysis you need to manage your way through this unprecedented crisis.

Now, there’s a way you can help us keep doing this: by becoming a SmartCompany supporter.

Even a small contribution will help us to keep doing the journalism that keeps Australia’s entrepreneurs informed.

Trending

COMMENTS

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments