THE NEWS WRAP: Facebook updates its community standards policies

Facebook has attempted to clarify its community standards and approach to government requests following criticism of the way it censors content and has discriminated against users who are not using their legal name online.

 

Facebook’s head of global policy management Monika Bickert said in a statement the social media giant’s updated community standards are designed to “create an environment where people feel motivated and empowered to treat each other with empathy and respect”.

 

“It’s a challenge to maintain one set of standards that meets the needs of a diverse global community,” she said.

 

“For one thing, people from different backgrounds may have different ideas about what’s appropriate to share – a video posted as a joke by one person might be upsetting to someone else, but it may not violate our standards.”

 

Facebook’s updated community standards, which clarify how and when the social network removes content online, can be viewed here.

Yik Yak founders say their app has “very little” cyberbullying

The founders of anonymous messaging app Yik Yak have defended their startup following criticism around cyberbullying on the location-based platform.

 

Speaking at the South by Southwest conference, co-founders Tyler Droll and Brooks Buffington said it was a misconception their app was a melting pot of threats and cyberbullying, according to TechCrunch.

 

“Both of those are not what we see on a daily basis,” says Droll.

 

In November last year Yik Yak raised $US62 million in funding, bringing the startup’s valuation to between around $US300 million and $US400 million.

Aussie kids are spending almost a day each week on their phones

Children in Australia are spending almost an entire day each week on their smartphones, according to research published by Telstra.

 

While the average age of smartphone ownership for children is 12, the study found 10-year-olds spend on average 14.7 hours a week glued to their phones. Meanwhile 17-year-olds spend on average 26.3 hours each week on their smartphones.

 

Family researcher Justin Coulson told Fairfax children shouldn’t be given a phone until they are at least 12 or 13, and even then there should be rules surrounding the phone’s usage.

 

“Smart parents give their kids dumb phones,” he said.

 

“You don’t give them too much too soon… kids don’t need smartphones.”

Overnight

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 228.11 points, rising 1.29% overnight to 17,977.42. The Aussie dollar is currently trading at around 76.41 US cents.

 

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