THE NEWS WRAP: Snapchat urges teens not to send nudes

Popular photo-sharing app Snapchat has urged teenage users not to send nude pictures or videos to one another.

 

The Snapchat Safety Center reminds users of the platform’s community guidelines and is also aimed at parents and teachers worried about young people using the app.

 

“Don’t use Snapchat for any illegal shenanigans and if you’re under 18 or are Snapping with someone who might be: keep your clothes on!” the site reads.

 

Snapchat is currently valued at around $US19 billion.

Marketing startup raises $14 million

A Texas marketing startup aimed at helping small businesses manage their social media presence has raised $14 million in Series B funding.

 

The round was led by Bessemer Venture Partners along with existing investors.

 

Co-founder and chief executive of Main Street Hub, Andrew Allison, said in a statement the funding will be used to further develop the company’s technology operations and expand its sales presence in Austin, San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles.

 

“Keeping up with shifts in social media and other ways to connect with customers online is a full time job, but it’s not something most local businesses are staffed to manage,” he said.

 

“Main Street Hub makes the process painless and rewarding with a full service ‘do-it-for-you’ SaaS marketing platform that helps local businesses through the entire marketing funnel with a combination of people, data and innovative technology.”

 

To date, the startup has raised more than $20 million in equity financing.

Australian Federal Police Assistant Commissioner defends metadata plans

The Australian Federal Police Assistant Commissioner Tim Morris has defended the government’s proposed Data Retention Bill during a speech at the Tech Leaders conference in the Blue Mountains yesterday.

 

Fairfax reports that, according to Morris, the AFP will not access the metadata of Australian citizens unless there is a criminal investigation already underway.

 

“Inconsistent retention and unavailability of this data is hampering investigations and in some cases preventing perpetrators to be brought to justice,” he said.

 

“Your chances that your data will be viewed by law enforcement is low. Those with nothing to hide have nothing to fear.”

 

The proposed legislation would currently require Australian phone and internet companies to store customer data so that intelligence agencies can access it without a warrant.

 

There are fears these powers could be abused and negatively affect journalists wishing to protect anonymous sources who leak against government and security agencies.

Overnight

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 0.86%, rising 154.67 points to 18,140.44. The Aussie dollar is currently trading at 78.43 US cents.

 

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