Three vaccines now needed to be ‘up to date’, as states and territories eye sector mandates

fully vaccinated

The ATAGI recommended to refer to it as "up to date" on vaccination, rather than "fully vaccinated". Source: Unsplash/Steven Cornfield.

“Fully vaccinated” should mean three doses of a vaccine, according to the independent advisory body, as the states and territories were given the power to create a patchwork of mandates across the country.

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) made the recommendation that the booster becomes part of the definition to national cabinet yesterday, but advised leaders to refer to it as “up to date” on vaccination, rather than “fully vaccinated”.

It advised a person should get a booster three months after their second dose, and should be considered “overdue” if they had not had a booster shot within six months.

Around 9 million people aged over 16 have received their third shot so far in Australia, but Catholic Health Australia (CHA) — which accounts for 10% of the country’s hospital-based healthcare — said people were too relaxed about the booster.

“A huge contributor to the speed of vaccination last year was people feeling responsibility for getting low rates to climb,” CHA’s manager of health policy Alex Lynch says.

“We need to put that impetus on society once again.”

Lynch says a fully vaccinated community, with three doses for all who are eligible, “will help alleviate pressure on our hospitals and start getting us back to normal”.

Workers in aged care are the only cohort required to receive three vaccines under the national mandate, but state and territory leaders were told they were free to choose whether to mandate sections of the 16+ population.

The ATAGI recommended any changes to state or territory rules should be delayed until March, however.

Victoria has already mandated the booster for workforces in healthcare and social services, but workers have until mid-March to receive their third vaccine.

Premier Daniel Andrews was less insistent on a three-jab rule on international arrivals yesterday, after he was met with a strong reaction from business and tourism groups in the state.

“We will try to the maximum extent possible to have consistent rules that will probably mean they won’t be perfect rules because we will all have to compromise a little bit,” he says.

Andrews continued that it may mean Victoria has different rules in some circumstances, like “some people who are here short term, for instance”.

“There might be different rules for someone who isn’t necessarily a citizen but is a resident for the purposes of international study,” he says.

The ATAGI is also mulling over whether the vulnerable will require a fourth shot and checking medical supply chains and auditing hospital capacity to ensure the country is prepared for a dangerous second wave of Omicron forecast this winter.

It comes as the Therapeutic Goods Administration provisionally approved the AstraZeneca booster, known as Vaxzevria, for people aged 18 and older, but the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines remain the preferred booster in Australia, according to the government.

“The Australian Government continues to encourage individuals to have a booster (third dose) following their initial two vaccination doses to enable strong protection against severe illness and hospitalisation, particularly from the omicron variant,” a TGA spokesperson advised.

COMMENTS

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
7 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Serious new government needed
Serious new government needed
3 months ago

A booster every 3 months….hmmm… I suppose businesses will be happy to give a week off for every booster required to manage the people who become ill from the boosters and can’t work (there are many)? Another 4 weeks a year adds up….

Krusty
Krusty
3 months ago

🤡

Mark
Mark
3 months ago

The 3-month time frame does not coincide with the science of the medical reports that have been released from the EU and the UK in the last month saying that boosters should only be given every 6 months. Giving people boosters on reduced time frames less than 6 months weakens their immune system.

Gary
Gary
3 months ago

They are getting desperate now as everything continues to falls apart as the truth becomes self-evident from what has been said the last 2 years. There should be a Royal Commission into several bodies. The media sector, Big Pharma, Privately run Hospitals and health services and many other cohorts IMO.

JSB
JSB
3 months ago

So, with a wildfire spread of Omicron in a large majority vaxxed population, we’re being told to have another shot because the first 2 didn’t ‘stop the spread’?

Omicron is no worse than a bad cold or mild ‘flu and while other countries are dropping ALL requirements, even in their winter (see Ireland, UK, Denmark for example), we’re doubling-down on another round of vaccinations for what exactly?

“You can fool some of the people some of the time …”

Matthew
Matthew
3 months ago

Why doesn’t the government back the hell away from our lives! You want the vaccine? Great! You don’t want it? Great! EVERYONE ought to be free do decide for themselves what they put into their bodies, it’s called full, free and informed consent, without any discrimination or coercion. It used to be the law until this never-ending state of emergency. The mandates are no longer justified for a host of reasons, not least of which is that they are unethical and not relevant in the current context. Stay healthy everyone, stay awesome and let’s make the future of Australia bright and FREE!

John
John
3 months ago

Over my dead body

Close
SmartCompany Plus

Sign in

To connect a sign in method the email must match the one on your SmartCompany Plus account.
Or use your email
Show
Forgot your password?

Want some assistance?

Contact us on: support@smartcompany.com.au or call the hotline: +61 (03) 8623 9900.