Myer hopes Uber deal will drive shoppers to stores: How to plan a digital partner strategy

Myer

Myer is courting young shoppers this weekend in a “partner perks” deal with Uber.

Myer One members spending $100 or more online or in store on Friday or Saturday will receive a $40 Uber voucher.

SmartCompany understands it’s a deal that has been in the works for some time, with the department store looking to capitalise on current trends and expand its focus on digital strategy.

“We’ve had a good relationship with Uber over the past year,” a Myer spokesperson said.

Shoppers have to have an email address registered with their Myer One account, and after a purchase is completed an electronic voucher will be emailed to the shopper.

The aim is to capitalise on the number of shoppers and tourists that need transport during the coming weekend, which includes Victoria’s Grand Final Eve public holiday on Friday and Labour Day in New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and South Australia on Monday.

“With the AFL and NRL grand finals on this weekend we think there will be plenty of Ubers on the road,” Myer’s spokesperson said.

But there could be a catch – the e-voucher will be sent as a promo code to use with an Uber account “within 30 days of purchase”.

The amount also has to be used in one go – any unused portion of the fare will be forfeited.

Myer Uber offer

Myer One members were told of the offer in an email on Thursday evening.

Fine print aside, one marketing and branding expert has praised the department store for coming up with an outward-looking promotion that understands the way people travel and shop.

“When you plan or develop complementary brand promotions, you’re looking at those that target a particular demographic you are after,” says InsideOut PR director Nicole Reaney.

While many young shoppers might already have an Uber account, the deal does require that shoppers are members both Myer One and already use Uber, or are willing to sign up.

Reaney says this could potentially dampen the impact of the deal.

“The most successful promotions are ones that have limited consumer obstacles – so they can achieve the deal in one step,” she says.

Other established Australian retailers have done deals with tech giants over the past year, like Optus’ deal with Airbnb, which saw customers who booked international stays through the accommodation site get a $30 pre-paid SIM card.

Myer is one year into its strategic review and says that these kind of tie-ins could become more common in the future. In July, chief executive Richard Umbers told an audience at a British Chamber of Commerce lunch that the store’s goal was to maintain “relevance” to Australian shoppers.

Reaney says smaller operators need to know that deals with established businesses can be effective, but a lot of time goes into them.

“With larger corporates, they do tend to plan well ahead,” she says.

“The marketing contact at a larger organisation can take be difficult to find, and it does take some time to break in.”

If it works, though, the payoff could be goodwill from users who might usually go elsewhere to buy your products – and it’s something the department store might extend if shoppers respond well.

“Uber is something that is popular with our younger customers, so we’ll see how the promo goes,” says Myer’s spokesperson.

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steve
steve
3 years ago

As an old player in the market place I would have hoped that Myer would support the taxi industry. Especially when they are going through the same sort of problems with online shopping and not playing on a level playing field. I know where I wont be spending money in the future. Shame on you Myer, just kick the Taxi industry in the guts when they need your help. It’s sad to see taxis owners that have spent up to a million dollars to play fairly by the government rules have some upstart come along with nothing but an APP and wipe them out. We all should look at our business model and see if we may be next? I have been watching this for ages, and have heard horror stories of people losing their house and everything they worked for. I for one will never enter an UBER car. And I can not wait for Uber to introduce Driver less cars and watch all these people lose their business over night and see how they like it. Game on, I say seems there are 2 different rules and we all need to watch our back.

Don Hesh
Don Hesh
3 years ago
Reply to  steve

some good points from Steve… Seriously.. one day their will be Driver less cars…

Marc Guevarra
Marc Guevarra
3 years ago
Reply to  steve

Whilst I agree that it is sad how many taxi drivers are in the financial hole due to the emergence of Uber, but that is the outcome of a business model that solves a customer’s pain point created by the Taxi companies: poor customer service, and lack of transparency.

In the past, I have called up to book a taxi, and ended up waiting 15 minutes longer than the time I arranged – no phone call or message to advise, no apology by the driver, no acknowledgement.

With Uber, it shows on your phone a live map of exactly where your driver is and the path that he takes to arrive at your location. It also gives you a pretty accurate ETA, so if it says 5 minutes to go, I would expect him to be at the corner of Duncan St and Shepperton Rd. If I look on the map, I can see exactly where he is to check up on that!

With a taxi, you cannot get in contact with the driver to ask him why he is late picking you up. If you call the Office, they might contact him for you and tell you that he is 5 minutes away. How can I be sure that he really is 5 minutes away? Uber allows me to check where he is on a map and track his vehicle in live-traffic.

It also shows you who your driver is (name, details and photo) which makes it easier to get back into contact with if you leave something in the car, or provides a safeguard against him taking advantage of you.

Marc Guevarra
Marc Guevarra
3 years ago
Reply to  steve

I agree that it is sad how many taxi drivers are in the financial hole due to the emergence of Uber, but that is the outcome of a business model that solves a customer’s pain point CREATED by the Taxi companies: poor customer service, and lack of transparency.

In the past (on multiple occasions), I have called up to book a taxi, and ended up waiting 15 minutes longer than the time I arranged – no phone call or message to advise, no apology by the driver. Not any form of acknowledgement.

With Uber, it shows on your phone a live map of exactly where your driver is and the path that he takes to arrive at your location. It also gives you a pretty accurate ETA, so if it says 5 minutes to go, I would expect him to be at the corner of Duncan St and Shepperton Rd. If I look on the map, I can see exactly where he is to check up on that!

With a taxi, you cannot get in contact with the driver to ask him why he is late picking you up. If you call the Office, they might contact him for you and tell you that he is 5 minutes away. How can I be sure that he really is 5 minutes away? Uber allows me to check where he is on a map and track his vehicle in live-traffic. I am not relying on a third-person and hoping they are not lying to me to make me feel better.

It also shows you who your driver is (name, details and photo) which makes it easier to get back into contact with if you leave something in the car, or provides a safeguard against him taking advantage of you.