professional development

Eye on the prize

Engel Schmidl /

As it rocked backward and forward rhythmically, the kookaburra became even more fascinating to me.

While the branch it perched upon swayed to and fro in the wind, the kookaburra’s head didn’t move.

As the branch moved backwards, the kookaburra’s body went with it; but its head and, most importantly, its eyes remained stationary, many small muscles compensating for each movement in the wind.

While watching for food or predators the kookaburra always has a focused, undeterred view of its surroundings.

It’s a neat genetic ability and one that I’m sure helps many kookaburras survive and thrive (especially in my backyard!)

I’ve known a few kookaburras in my professional life too. Their eye is always on the prize. Regardless of whatever currents or wind or distractions are moving their branch, they remain laser focused.

How can you emulate a kookaburra? How can you block out distractions and keep your head steady when all around you is moving?

Kirsty Dunphey is the youngest ever Australian Telstra Young Business Woman of the Year, author of two books (her latest release is Retired at 27, If I Can do it Anyone Can) and a passionate entrepreneur who started her first business at age 15 and opened her own real estate agency at 21.

Now Kirsty does lots of fun things which you can read about here. Her favourite current projects are Elephant Property, a boutique property management agency, Baby Teresa, a baby clothing line that donates an outfit to a baby in need for each one they sell and ReallySold, which helps real estate agents stop writing boring, uninteresting ads.




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