Crisp software’s hard approach

CrispTo help reassure those unhappy about the “Wild West” nature of the internet, a British entrepreneur has come up with software called Crisp, which polices cyber bullying and online content.

 

The brainchild of 26-year-old Adam Hildreth, Crisp analyses users’ language and actions to identify harassment, spamming or predators on the lookout for victims.

 

The system reacts in real time to warn or ban people who misbehave, or refer them to human moderators.

 

According to Hildreth, Crisp processes 500 million pieces of user-generated content a month for internet clients, sorting through comments, chat messages and blog posts.

 

Most of the analysis is based on word use, although the software also tracks online behaviours such as friend requests on social sites or patterns of activity in a virtual game.

 

Crisp’s filters detect obscene or inappropriate messages even when users break them into multiple lines in attempts to disguise them. The technology also judges users in the context of their past behaviour, with a repeat offender blocked from the site right away.

 

Hildreth’s clients include Electronic Arts and the Cartoon Network, which pay up to 10,000 a month for his software.

 

He expects revenue to double to $5 million in 2011, and has his sights set on servicing social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

 

Is there a way for an Australian entrepreneur to take advantage of this trend in a similar way?

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