New funding aims to make stars of Victorian film and TV companies

The Victorian government has unveiled new funding to help small film, TV and digital businesses in the state spread their content online to international markets.

 

The funding, given to industry body Film Victoria via the Screen Business – Online program, is aimed at helping companies market their content to new audiences.

 

Activities supported by the scheme include SEO to boost online rankings, the development of analytics to illustrate audience behaviour and location and the development of distribution channels, such as video on demand.

 

Businesses will be able to apply for a grant of up to $10,000 to create or extend their online presence. The money can be used for the business, individual projects or for a back catalogue.

 

Louise Asher, Victoria’s innovation, services and small business minister, says:  “Screen Business – Online will help Victorian screen businesses benefit from online distribution and up-skill their businesses to take advantage of future digital platforms.”

 

“This pioneering new initiative will support businesses in delivering content to the global market by providing access to funds to set up a sustainable online presence, as well as create, distribute and sell content online to enable a wider audience beyond the traditional screens of TV and cinema.”

 

“This will give our local companies access to larger audiences around the globe and will ultimately increase investment, export and jobs in Victoria’s screen industry.”

 

Sandra Sdraulig, CEO of Film Victoria, adds: “We know that increasingly, global audiences are viewing screen content online and we’re helping local companies deliver in this environment.”

 

“This initiative will also result in improved websites, social media engagement and use of analytics, all of which will help Victorian content reach global audiences.”

 

According to Film Victoria, 88 film, television and digital media projects commenced production in the state in 2009/10, spending an estimated $233 million. This was the second highest spend on record, driven predominantly by local activity.

Trending

COMMENTS

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments