Growth, Local

ilab investment summit to “demystify” capital raising

Michelle Hammond /

Tech start-ups are being invited to attend ilab’s annual investment summit, where they will gain insight into the investment strategies of angel investors and venture capitalists.

 

Technology incubator ilab helps tech start-ups grow into successful businesses through coaching, mentoring and training. Based in Queensland, ilab is financially supported by the State Government.

 

ilab chief executive Colin Kinner has put the call out to start-ups to attend the incubator’s annual investment summit, which will be held in Brisbane on August 25.

 

“ilab’s annual investment summit brings together investors from the local angel and venture capital communities to help demystify the process of raising capital,” Kinner says.

 

“This half-day event will give entrepreneurs valuable insights into the investment strategies of angel and venture capital investors, as well as perspectives from successful entrepreneurs who have raised capital to grow their business.”

 

Speakers include John Mactaggart, chairman of the Australian Association of Angel Investors, CM Capital partner Andy Jane and serial entrepreneur Tom McKaskill.

 

According to ilab, these are tough times for tech start-ups, so industry events can be a vital source of information.

 

“The economic climate is uncertain, venture capital funding is scarce, and many new businesses struggle to make it past the starting post,” it says.

 

“ilab helps selected entrepreneurs survive and thrive by showing them how to navigate the pitfalls which claim many new start-ups.”

 

“We work with start-up founders, providing targeted advice, guidance and mentoring to accelerate the growth of their venture by making considered plans and executing them swiftly and expertly.”

 

Haig Kayserian, founder and chief executive of Australian-run New York angel fund Kayweb Angels, says start-ups shouldn’t be deterred by the United States’ credit crisis.

 

“In my industry of tech, innovation remains an in-demand commodity. If a start-up’s idea and model is good, investors… will invest in it,” he says.

 

“There are still cashed-up accounts managed by people who know that a good investment will pay for itself, and more, tomorrow.”

 

“[My advice to start-ups is to] keep pitching. We just made another three web and mobile start-up investments… and plan to make more before 2011 ends.”

 

Meanwhile, the much-anticipated Tech23 event will take place in Sydney later this month.

 

Twenty-three tech companies, selected from more than 150 applicants, will be given five minutes to pitch their business model to an expert panel for the chance to share in $150,000.

 

“We’ll also have an incredible range of industry leaders on hand to share their expertise with our Tech23 companies and our 400-plus audience,” an event spokesperson says.

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