Mentor, Vicki Crowe

I’ve taken on my first member of staff. Should I try and be best friends with her, or keep a professional distance?

StartupSmart /

I’ve taken on my first member of staff. Should I try and be best friends with her, or keep a professional distance?

 

When you work in close proximity with employees in a micro-business, it can often be difficult to draw the line between friendship and running a professional business.

 

While it is critically important to maintain a friendly, pleasant and open environment, it doesn’t mean you need to be everyone’s BFF.

 

As the employer, bonding or forming close friendships can place you in a very difficult position if things suddenly turn sour.

 

If you really want to bring out the best in your staff, talk to them about what their motivators are to come to work (besides money) and how you can assist them to develop in the role.

 

Although money will be one of the factors, if you peel down a bit, you will find that everyone will have a variety of different reasons, values and motivations that drive them to get out of bed in the morning and come to work.

 

Research shows that employees leave managers or employers more than they leave their jobs or the company.

 

Just being the boss is no longer good enough to retain valued employees. Great leaders continually work on improving their emotional intelligence and leadership skills.

 

They also need to identify that in order for their businesses to succeed in the future, they must develop their employees according to their individual needs.

 

Below are some of the of key intrinsic motivators:

  1. Personal fulfilment from helping or caring for others.
  2. Success, reward and public recognition.
  3. Gaining knowledge, through training or personal development.
  4. Being able to improve internal and external systems.
  5. Social stimulation, fun and challenging.

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