Apple registers for ‘iWatch’ trademark in multiple countries

Apple has delivered yet another clue the company is working on a wearable computing device, registering trademarks for an ‘iWatch’ in several countries.

Although earlier this week news broke Apple had trademarked the name ‘iWatch’ in Japan, new reports indicate similar applications have been made in countries including Mexico, Taiwan, Turkey and Colombia.

The applications have been made in Mexico, according to 9to5Mac, along with Taiwan and Turkey, according to MacRumors.

The trademark applications join a growing pile of evidence the company is working on a wearable computing device. Several weeks ago chief executive Tim Cook said at a conference in New York the company would be watching the wearable computing market with “great interest”.

He also took the opportunity to take a swipe at Google’s Glass product, saying he wasn’t sure how you could convince people to wear glasses if they didn’t have to.

Apple has applied for trademarks in product categories such as ‘computers’ and ‘personal digital assistants’.

Applications for trademarks are an expensive process. While Apple is known for patenting ideas and never using them, actually registering for trademarks is a slightly more serious step.

But Apple isn’t likely to apply for the trademark in the United States – at least, not yet. The country is the only one which requires a company to actually have proof of an existing, working product before a trademark can become available.

There is certainly growing proof that this product will become a reality. Earlier this year, The New York Times reported the project was underway.

Bruce Thomas, the director of the Wearable Computer Lab at the University of South Australia, told SmartCompany this morning wearable computing devices have been around for years. Their sudden popularity in the mainstream is due to a need to make technology less disruptive of social interaction.

“We use a term called ‘social weight’ – how much does tech interrupt social interaction?

“The idea is that taking your phone out has a much larger ‘social weight’ than looking at a wristwatch.

“I see the integration of technology into clothes and garments is a way for people to stay connected, but not be as disruptive.”

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